“Timmy, that’ll shoot your eye out!!” Five Tips to Avoid Toy Related Eye Injuries

Santa
Santa recommends safe toys for Christmas!

With the holiday shopping season in full swing, Florida Eye Institute joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology to remind you of important safety guidelines when choosing the perfect gift children. Recent studies show that many popular toys are commonly associated with childhood eye injuries including air guns, toys that shoot projectiles, high-powered lasers, and sports equipment.

Ophthalmologists – physicians who specialize in medical and surgical eye care – encourage parents to follow these tips when shopping this holiday season.

  1. Beware of airsoft, BB guns, and other projectile toys. Every year ophthalmologists treat thousands of devastating eye injuries caused by toys. Avoid items with sharp, protruding or projectile parts such as airsoft guns, BB guns, and other gun–related foreign objects can easily propel into the sensitive tissue of the eye.
  2. Never allow children to play with high-powered laser pointers. A number of recent reports in the United States and internationally show that children have sustained serious eye injuries playing with high-powered lasers (between 1500 and 6000 milliwatts). Over the years, these lasers have become increasingly more powerful, with enough potential to cause severe retinal damage with just seconds of laser exposure to the eye. The FDA advises the public to never aim or shine a laser pointer at anyone and to not buy laser pointers for children.
  3. Read labels for age recommendations before you buy. To select appropriate gifts suited for a child’s age, follow the age recommendations and instructions about proper assembly, use, and supervision.
  4. Don’t just give presents. Make sure to be present. Always make sure an adult is supervising when children are playing with potentially hazardous toys or games that could cause an eye injury.
  5. Know what to do (and what not to). If someone you know experiences an eye injury, seek immediate medical attention from an ophthalmologist. Make sure to never touch, rub, apply pressure, or attempt to remove objects in the eye. If an eye injury occurs, follow these important care and treatment guidelines.

“Even though we often kid around about “poking your eye out” with certain toys, injuries to children during the holidays are no laughing matter,” states Dr. Wilson Wallace, board-certified ophthalmologist at Florida Eye Institute. “It’s easy to get distracted during this busy time of year and we forget how quickly inquisitive kids can get injured playing with certain toys. Remember these basic tips to keep your little ones healthy. And if accidents do happen, seek help right away.”

For more information on toy safety, see the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s toy safety page or watch the toy safety video.

Florida Eye Institute has locations in Vero Beach and Sebastian. Appointments are appropriate for all ages including children. Medicare and most insurance are accepted. For more information call 772.569.9500 or visit www.fleye.com.

Content courtesy of AAO and Florida Eye Institute

 

It’s National Diabetes Month – Are you at risk for serious eye disease?

Florida Eye Institute specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of Diabetic Eye Disease.
Florida Eye Institute specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of Diabetic Eye Disease.

Did you know that 95% of diabetes-related vision loss could be prevented with a regular eye exam?

Diabetes increases the risk of developing serious eye disease, yet most people do not have sight-saving, annual eye exams, according to a large study. Florida Eye Institute joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in recognizing the importance of eye health this November, observed nationally as Diabetes Awareness Month.

One in 10 Americans has diabetes, putting them at heightened risk for visual impairment. Diabetic eye disease is a group of conditions that include retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. Fluctuating blood sugar creates fragile, abnormal blood vessels that grow and leak within the eye, distorting vision. Distortions can advance to blindness if left untreated.

Researchers at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia found that more than half of patients with the Diabetes skip annual eye exams. They also discovered that patients who smoke – and therefore more likely to have signs of diabetic eye disease – were most likely to neglect to have annual check-ups.

Collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers reviewed charts of nearly 2,000 patients age 40 or older with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to see how many had regular eye exams. Their findings over a four-year period revealed that:

  • Fifty-eight percent of patients did not have regular follow-up eye exams
  • Smokers were 20 percent less likely to have exams
  • Those with less severe disease and no eye problems were least likely to follow recommendations
  • Those who had diabetic retinopathy were 30 percent more likely to have follow-up exams

“The bottom line is – if you have Diabetes you need a retina eye exam every year,” states Thomas Baudo, MD, fellowship trained retina specialist with Florida Eye Institute.

“Eye exams are critical as they often reveal hidden signs of disease, and that allows us to begin treatment early,” he emphasizes. “Patients are also pleased to discover that a baseline exam with a retina specialist costs no more than any other type of eye care professional.”

Looking for a Good Eye Doctor?

Florida Eye Institute specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic eye disease as well as advanced procedures for cataract, glaucoma, and corneal conditions.   Comprehensive care is available for the entire family, including designer eyewear and the latest bladeless laser vision correction.

Florida Eye Institute has locations in Vero Beach and Sebastian. Most health insurance plans, including Medicare, cover an annual exam with an ophthalmologist. For more information call 772.569.9500 or visit www.fleye.com.

Content Courtesy of AAO & Florida Eye Institute

 

Protect yourself from Flu Myths! Florida Eye Institute Hosts Flu Clinics

Yellow Caution Sign Get Your
Get Your Flu Shot before the Season Begins

The CDC confirms that getting vaccinated remains the first and best way to protect against complications of the flu.

People over age 65, those with weakened immune systems or in frequent contact with the public are especially vulnerable.

An active flu season can mean frequent doctor visits, missed work and even hospitalizations. In order to build peak immunity before flu season hits, the CDC recommends vaccination prior to the end of October.

To get a healthy jump on the flu season, Florida Eye Institute will host two Flu Clinics in September for patients, staff and the public. Clinics are scheduled from 2:00 to 4:00 pm on Wednesday, September 12th at the Vero Beach location and  10:00 am to Noon, September 19th in Sebastian. The public is invited.

In addition to variations of the flu vaccine, pneumonia vaccines will also be available. Vaccinations have little to no out-of-pocket costs and are covered by commercial insurance and Medicare.

For more information call 772.569-9500 or visit www.fleye.com.

Florida Eye Institute is located at 2750 Indian River Blvd. in Vero Beach and 13397 Us Hwy 1 in Sebastian.

Make Regular Eye Exams Part of Your Healthy Aging Strategy

Make Regular Eye Care a Part of Your Healthy Aging Strategy

According to a national survey released by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, nearly two out of three American adults report having eye or vision problems. A significant percentage of them, however, fail to seek medical attention in the form of regular, sight-saving eye exams.

In observance of Healthy Aging Month in September, the Florida Eye Institute joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in emphasizing the importance of having regular eye exams to maintain healthy eyes and vision.

Some of the more common age-related eye diseases include age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Early detection and treatment of these conditions can help to save sight before vision loss occurs [i]. Ophthalmologists – the physicians that specialize in medical and surgical eye care – recommend a dilated comprehensive eye exam as the best way to prevent these conditions from becoming debilitating.

U.S. Adults Do Not Get Eye Exams as Often as Recommended
The survey results emphasize a need for more education about the importance of medical eye exams. Findings showed that 64 percent of adults had at least one or more of the following issues with their eyes or vision:

  • difficulty seeing at night;
  • blurry vision;
  • reading up close;
  • flashes of light;
  • red, watery eyes; and,
  • double vision.

Despite experiencing some level of impairment, only 13 percent admitted they had been seen by an ophthalmologist.

How Often Do Adults Need Eye Exams?
The Academy recommends that a healthy adult get a baseline eye exam at age 40, even if they have no history of eye problems or eye disease. Those who have chronic conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, may require more frequent exams.

Those over age 65 who may be concerned about cost or lack of health insurance, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Eyecare America program offers eligible seniors a comprehensive eye exam and up to one year of treatment at no out-of-pocket cost.

Looking for a Good Eye Doctor?

Florida Eye Institute specializes in the advanced treatment of retina, cataract, glaucoma, and corneal eye disease. You’ll also find complete eye care for the entire family, including designer eyewear and the latest bladeless LASIK vision correction.

Florida Eye Institute has locations in Vero Beach and Sebastian. Medicare and most health insurance are accepted. For more information call 772.569.9500 or visit www.fleye.com.

Content Courtesy of AAO & Florida Eye Institute

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[i] https://nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/aging_eye

 

June is Cataract Awareness Month. Are You at Risk?

Living with cataract can be compared to looking at life through a dirty window.

The condition clouds the eye’s natural lens, causing changes in vision. Sensitivity to glare, dulled color perception, increased nearsightedness and frequent changes to eyeglass prescriptions are common with the onset of cataract.

But, cataracts not only makes life less vibrant, they can dull the visual cues used to prevent personal injury. Studies show untreated cataract increases the risk of accidents for older adults – up to 75% in some cases.

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found automobile drivers who delayed the needed eye procedure were twice as likely to be involved in a car crash than those who opted to have treatment when medically appropriate.

Timely cataract replacement not only lowers the risk of auto accident, it can reduce the risk of damaging hip fracture. An analysis of Medicare patients showed an astonishing 16% decrease in hip fractures after cataract surgery.

Cataract is largely considered a condition of aging, with nearly 23 million Americans showing evidence of the disease. Most individuals will develop cataract by age 80.

Treatment involves removal of the clouded natural lens and replacing it with an intraocular lens (IOL) implant. Cataract removal is considered the safest and most common procedure performed in the US today, with more than a million surgeries conducted annually.

In observance of Cataract Awareness Month, Florida Eye Institute will host Free Vision Screenings during June. The screenings provide an opportunity to meet with trained ophthalmic technicians to discuss your risk of cataract or other eye condition. Hours are 9:00 am – 11:00 am; Friday, June 8th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th at both Florida Eye Institute locations.

Multi-Yard Sale to Benefit Relay for Life

Don’t miss the 3rd annual Florida Eye Institute Yard Sale to benefit Relay for Life of Indian River. You’ll find a wealth of treasures including a wide array of household & kitchen items and clothing for the entire family!

Sale begins 7:30 AM (no early birds please!) in the Florida Eye Institute parking lot and ends at 11:30 AM. Enjoy homemade baked goods and fresh coffee while you shop.

All donations benefit Relay for Life scheduled at Vero Beach High School in April